Elf Snowballs

Baseball-O-Matic 9000

Farrell took Price out in the bottom of the 9th and the Angels beat the Red Sox in Anaheim.

I like Farrell, Price, and the Red Sox. I have no bones to pick there. I also have no set demand that pitchers always throw more than 100 pitches — Price had thrown 109 through eight.

My thesis is simple: the pitcher in the game should be the one who can get the other team out.

If that’s someone you leave in there, put in there, or swap in and out five times in an inning …

Whatever.

In fact, apropos of the 100 pitch count … I’d support a starting pitcher throwing three innings or 50 pitches (or 72 or 19 or … ). The whole point — your one job — is to get batters out. That’s it.

But managers are technicians. All of baseball is about techné. It’s stomach-churning to watch. It’s ugly. It’s endemic. It’s Tab-A-Into-Slot-B work and no wonder sports talk is so stoopid.

The way they play the game today it could all be done by a bunch of pimply 12-year-olds in a room wallpapered with Radiohead posters.

Try these ideas —

  1. Everything currently done in pitching — pitch count, starter, set-up man, closer — because “that’s the way it’s done” was at one time not done. Hell, in baseball overall.
  2. The 100 pitch count is totally arbitrary, a function of our fascination with round numbers and a vague idea of pitches per inning, times about 6 or 7 of those frames.
  3. The pitch count stays at 100 in both leagues — even though National League pitchers also hit. If we’re worried about their constitutions, shouldn’t they only throw … 75?
  4. If a pitcher throws 110 or (heaven help us!) 120 pitches all the old ladies in the broadcaster booth bust open their well-worn manuals and start squawking about fatigue.
    BUT
  5. If a pitcher gets hammered one game and only throws 50 pitches, nobody says, “Oh, well; he can do 150 on his next start, then.”
  6. Also arbitrary: “set-up” guys and “closers” do far fewer than 100? Why? They throw harder? Not all of them. But so what? Talking heads start squealing like pigs at 20 pitches anyway.
  7. A six-man rotation. Instead of five starts a month, pitchers take four. Voilá! Now each can throw 125 per start … right?
  8. Mix it up. Have them throw 50 one game, 75 another, 100 another. Why not? They stay in to get batters out, they “confuse” their muscles, they push, they rest … whatever works.
  9. Pay pitchers per pitch. If the problem is length of season or career pay a base salary + per pitch. Pay per pitch over a certain per-game average or season total.
  10. The difference between what I’m saying and what occurs is as few as a five to 15 pitches — about 10% of a night’s total. That’s going to kill the guy’s next start?
  11. Everyone can go (up to) one more inning which would solve the “problem” of the six-man rotation (e.g., the cost). This does not mean they must go an extra inning; it says they can.
  12. The reason this isn’t going to happen — until of course it does and everyone freaks out … and then it begins to work … and is widely adopted — is “that’s the way it’s done.”

Not “that’s the way we do it,” mind you — because that would require human agency and a little imagination.

But of course that’s what they have — a very, very, very little imagination.

 

Archimedes

Idea: Inspiration

They asked Newton* how he did it and he’s supposed to have said,

I thought about it all the time. 

* Yes, it’s Archimedes. Keep reading.

Inspiration is for amateurs. Chuck Close

You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club. Jack London

Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working. Picasso

Inspiration is a word used by people who aren’t really doing anything. I go into my office every day that I’m in Brighton and work. Whether I feel like it or not is irrelevant. Nick Cave

If you wait for inspiration you’re not a writer you’re a waiter. Dan Poynter

Inspiration usually comes during work, not before it. Madeleine L’Engle

No sensible person would deny … the mystery of inspiration. But … it is useless to depend on [it]. All prose responds to work. Tracy Kidder

Serious writers write, inspired or not. Over time they discover that routine is a better friend than inspiration. Ralph Keyes

Just as appetite comes by eating so work brings inspiration. Stravinsky

I write when I’m inspired. I make sure I’m inspired every morning at 9 am. Peter DeVries

There then a thing to think about.

Rainer Maria Rilke

Out of You and Me

An important decision

  • Zig Ziglar …
  • Wendell Berry …
  • or James Lee Burke?

The book one brings to morning coffee out is not unlike the t-shirt options one has later that evening

  • SpongeBob …
  • Arsenal F.C. …
  • or Feel the Bern?

Managing our reputations, as the LinkedInFluencers say. Wouldn’t wanna cross those guys.

It’s usually about trying to say something unique, trying to be something unique.

Of course we can’t avoid being unique but we don’t think we are, so we keep trying.

There’s another way. It’s harder but — by which I mean and thus — it’s well worth it. More precisely there are two ‘nother ways

  • Say something
  • Say nothing

Or rather

  • Say something different
  • Say nothing, which is different

An easy something different can be to ask the other a question. It must be honest and sincere. Prolly we’ll have to work at it.

To say nothing, which is different — that second option — means we can talk but only to comment on what the other says, not ourselves.

This isn’t about being coy or combative, shy or manipulative. It’s the studied studying of the other.

Why the other?

Because they are.

Rainer Maria Rilke said it was a marvel (or German to that effect) two people ever truly communicated, that one ever knew anything, or cd know anything, about the other. And he’s talking about people in love — people who want to know the other.

In any event … a marvel.

A wonder.

And that’s the key.

Knowing the other — making the other another — turning someone in your mind and heart from utterly alien to one who … isn’t … who is still an other into another — to one we come truly to want to know about … to know truly about … to know about truly … is a marvel, accomplished by wonder.

Treat it — and them — as one.

Lipstick on a Pig OK

Tesla Girl

Someone the other day called Elon Musk both an “inventor” and “a badass” but he is neither.

Let me say flat-out, upfront, and clearly it’s good that Musk — entrepreneur behind the Tesla carmaker, companies involved in solar power and space exploration, and who was previously part of PayPal — is alive. We need people like him if only so the 99% of the world who submit regularly to the status quo have some dreamers to gaze at in wonder.

Ideally they’d do more.

Think Different maybe.

Perhaps even live like it.

But.

So far as I know Musk hasn’t invented anything. Perhaps he holds patents but I’ve not see that mentioned. He’s an entrepreneur … so stretch the word on the rack … call an entrepreneur the inventor of a company … but why?

We already have a word for those.

Musk isn’t badass either. That’s a more subjective designation but is our badass bar so low that P.T. Barnum qualifies? What we have from him so far is the tell part of show tell — or show, as in tell. There’s no evidence yet. 

The “it ain’t braggin’ if you can do it” isn’t as true as “if you can do it you don’t have to brag.” To make matters a bit worse for the badass inventor title, Musk hasn’t actually shown he can do it.

  1. The companies aren’t profitable,
  2. relying heavily on government money,
  3. and the spaceships keep, well … blowing up.

Once more: Elon Musk out there shilling is an objective good.

It’s only hucksterism if he fails but we don’t know yet. So about Musk, these three:

  1. He’s neither an inventor,
  2. nor is he quite badass,
  3. so stop idolizing him.

I hope he’d agree. The best creative is one who also wants others to be, whatever shape it takes — “even” just fully realizing their own selves instead of defining it based on his.

He’s not as into himself as everyone else is.

This is often not the case. An idol himself often loves being on the pedestal just as those bowing to it are content to not-live vicariously through the statue they’ve erected.

That monument-building is about the only work the masses are ever going to do — until there is failure, as commonly there is, and the same mob lassoes the statue and melts it down, so it can put another up in its place.

An irony of our oft-vaunted and supposedly uber-democratic American world is how 330 million independent thinkers keep elevating the visionary and different to where they get a pass.

The visionary gets a pass and becomes a god without much actual accomplishment and those elevating him get a pass and remain where they are.

It’s all so neat and easy.

So what we get on Musk is material that comes from one kind of meme-hole and disappears into the other kind, asserting, for instance, that he got $180 million from his share of PayPal, when it sold, and put all of it into his companies — which, if true would mean

  1. He paid no taxes,
  2. and was literally broke,
  3. relying on handouts even then.

Surely he had a little bit socked away? This isn’t to deny his commercial success with PayPal — the evidence for that is there. It isn’t to say he’s not committed to his ideas and acting on them, tying current rewards (which measure in the billions of dollars) to sales targets and whatnot.

Good on him.

But this hero-worship of people who aren’t heroes in the way they’re being worshipped needs to stop. I saw a collection of quotations from Musk that barely reached the level of rumination by your average 15-year-old who has just smoked his first weed. Must be gospel though, since he made $180 million on PayPal.

(As with Donald Trump we wouldn’t care one bit about such verbalizing if not for the money.)

It’s good that Elon Musk lives and breathes and speaks.

May his actions — and his tribe — increase.

Ox

16 Precepts

You have asked me how to pursue learning. I pass this along in response —

  1. Move from the easier to the difficult
  2. Be cautious of speech
  3. Be slower still in frequenting places of talk
  4. Embrace purity of conscience
  5. Pray without ceasing
  6. Love your home and to be there often
  7. Show geniality to all 
  8. Pay no heed to others’ affairs
  9. Be not over-familiar with anyone; it breeds contempt and gives occasion to distraction
  10. Never get enmeshed with the sayings and doings of those in the outside world
  11. Most of all avoid vain visits and idle conversation
  12. Never mind who says what or from whom the lesson drops
  13. Remember any true and useful advice uttered; fill your cup
  14. Give an account to yourself of your every thought, word, and action
  15. See that you understand what you hear and don’t leave doubts be
  16. Remember. Walk always in the footsteps of good and holy men

— If you do this all your wildest dreams will come true.

*

The original is known as “16 Precepts for Acquiring the Treasure of Knowledge” and was written (in Latin of course) ostensibly by Saint Thomas Aquinas and to “Brother John” … neither is likely, but the material is sound and for a thought on that see No. 12. This post is edited from the two versions here and here.

 

Drudgery 2

Drudge Report

Babies need not to be taught a trade, but to be introduced to a world. To put the matter shortly, woman is generally shut up in a house with a human being at the time when he asks all the questions that there are, and some that there aren’t. It would be odd if she retained any of the narrowness of a specialist.

Now if anyone says that this duty of general enlightenment … is in itself too exacting and oppressive, I can understand the view. I can only answer that our race has thought it worthwhile to cast this burden on women in order to keep common sense in the world.

But when people begin to talk about this domestic duty as not merely difficult but trivial and dreary, I simply give up the question. For I cannot with the utmost energy of imagination conceive what they mean. When domesticity is called drudgery, all the difficulty arises from a double meaning in the word.

If drudgery only means dreadfully hard work, I admit the woman drudges in the home, as a man might drudge at the Cathedral of Amiens or drudge behind a gun at Trafalgar. But if it means that the hard work is ‘more heavy’ because it is trifling, colorless, and of small import to the soul, then as I say, I give it up; I do not know what the words mean.

To be Queen Elizabeth within a definite area, deciding sales, banquets, labors and holidays; to be Whiteley’s [department store] within a certain area, providing toys, boots, sheets, cakes, and books; to be Aristotle within a certain area, teaching morals, manners, theology, and hygiene — I can understand how this might exhaust the mind, but I cannot imagine how it could narrow it.

How can it be a large career to tell other people’s children about the Rule of Three [in arithmetic], and a small career to tell one’s own children about the universe? How can it be broad to be the same thing to everyone, and narrow to be everything to someone?

No. A woman’s function is laborious — because it is gigantic, not because it is minute. I will pity Mrs. Jones for the hugeness of her task; I will never pity her for its smallness.

GK Chesterton